Supposing I love you. And you also love me

Supposing I love you. And you also love me, 2011

Supposing I love you. And you also love me, 2011
Architectural intervention with bench and projection: Montage of still images with dialogue
sound, english subtitles, 13 minutes

The work brings the voice of the Swiss-Egyptian philosopher and theologian Tariq Ramadan into exchange with a group of five young adults of multicultural origin from Belgium and the Netherlands. Against the backdrop of a de Stijl-inspired broadcast building designed by Piet Elling, the Dutch architect and friend of Gerrit Rietveld, the work is set up as a polyphonic mini-tragedy. Unrehearsed forms of performance and speech, stemming from private experience, form the building blocks of the “drama”.

The cast is composed of Tariq Ramadan, Professor of Contemporary Islamic Studies at Oxford University; Hanane Driouchgril, Alberto Mvila, Annye de Santos, Janne van Eynde, all pupils at the Koninklijk Technisch Atheneum (Royal Technical Atheneum) in Mechelen and Ahmed Chouyouhi, who is studying communication sciences after graduating from this same school last year.

Filmed on location with their kind permission in Muziek Centrum van de Omroep, Hilversum (NL) and Royal College of Art, London (UK). Camera: Ben de Wandel, Sound: Jan Samson (in Hilversum) and Rob Entwistle (in London).

Supposing I love you. And you also love me is co-produced by the Danish Arts Council, If I Cant Dance, I Dont Want To Be Part Of Your Revolution (Amsterdam), and Wilfried Lentz Rotterdam; with the support of the Danish Arts Council, the Mondriaan Foundation, the Culture Programme of the European Union. For the first time shown in the curated group show SPEECH MATTERS by Katarina Gregos in the Danish Pavilion at the 54th Venice Biennale.

3 minute preview:

Wendelien van Oldenborgh, Supposing I love you. And you also love me, 2011 – PREVIEW from Wilfried Lentz on Vimeo.

When thoughts are expressed between people in the public sphere, some voices can be heard more actively than others, and will have more resonance. In the Netherlands, with its open and democratic society, in- convenient voices are cut short by the way other forces in society react to them. This is also happening in other northern European countries where censorship is not a governmental policy.
Supposing I love you. And you also love me (2011) brings the voice of the Swiss-Egyptian philosopher and theologian Tariq Ramadan into exchange with a group of five young adults of multicultural origin from Belgium and the Netherlands. Against the backdrop of a de Stijl-inspired broadcast building designed by Piet Elling, the Dutch architect and friend of Gerrit Rietveld, the work is set up as a polyphonic mini-tragedy. Unrehearsed forms of performance and speech form the building blocks of the “drama”. The adolescents act as a chorus in a playful interchange with Ramadan’s ideas and thoughts, which explore issues such as diversity, fear, conflict, and his own interrupted engagements in the city of Rotterdam. The script was formed ad hoc, during the shoot, and was guided by the cast’s own real-life experiences and forms of expression. The final short montage of slowly dissolving still images and dialogue has been edited as a polyphonic composition of voices, musical tones and images – each discrete inscrip- tion resonating with the others in their difference.
(text; catalogue Danish Pavilion 54th Venice Biennale)

Supposing I love you. And you also love me
Wendelien van Oldenborgh, Supposing I love you. And you also love me