Title One: The Tasks of the Community, 2012-2014

Title One: The Tasks of the Community borrows its title from the 1957 treaty that established the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom), one of the documents that serve as basis of the European Union. On December 31, 2009, despite extended popular resistance and profound economic consequences, Unit 2 of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant in Lithuania was closed under pressure of the European regulatory bodies. Paradoxically, as part of the EU-financed dismantling process, in 2011 several materials from the site were put up for auction as what the Ignalina plant’s website described as “unnecessary property”.
Biscotti attended two public auctions held at the plant, acquiring lead and industrial copper cables, which she then recycled in The Netherlands. 
The lead was melted and transformed in a floor sculpture and imported back to Lithuania to be shown at the CAC in Vilnius (LT) in 2012. Another bigger portion of the lead was melted into modular floor-based sculptures Title One for Manifesta 9 in Genk (BE) also in 2012.
At a later stage in 2014 a similar sculpture as in Vilnius was produced for a soloshow at Haus Esters in Krefeld (DE).
The copper scrap is recycled in a 190 meter long 125-A copper cable A Conductor, an artwork which supplied the electricity of Manifesta 9. In 2014 a smaller floorsculpture from the same copper scrap was presented at Haus Esters in Krefeld (DE). 
The show at Haus Esters showed a larger body of work, also included 10 x 10, 2014 and was on occasion of the fifteenth Mies van der Rohe Stipend which has been given to Rossella Biscotti.
Rossella Biscotti, Title One: The Tasks of the Community, 2012 - 2014
Rossella Biscotti, Title One: The Tasks of the Community, 2012 - 2014
recycled lead from Ignalina nuclear power plant (LT), 340 x 240 x 0,8 cm
installation view: Museum Haus Esters, Krefeld (DE), 2014
photo: Volker Döhne, Kunstmuseen Krefeld
Rossella Biscotti
A Conductor, 2012/2014
Copper cables from Ignalina nuclear power plant, glass, electrical wire
installation view: Museum Haus Esters, Krefeld (DE), 2014
Photo: Volker Döhne, Kunstmuseen Krefeld