Live feed, 2019

The amorphophallus titanum, also called titan arum, monochromatically pictured in this work, is a flowering plant with the largest unbranched in florescence in the world. It can reach over
3 metres in height. The species is endemic to Sumatra. During bloom, the temperature of
its flower tip is similar to a human body’s normal temperature (37 degrees Celsius). It generally requires seven to ten years of vegetative growth before the flower blooms for the first time. During flowering, the spathe generally begins to open between mid-afternoon and late-evening and remains open all night. Although most spathes begin to wilt within twelve hours, some have been known to remain open for a day or two. After its initial blooming, there can be considerable variation in the frequency of subsequent blooms. Some flowers may not bloom again for another decade, while others may bloom every couple of years.

The breeds’ rarity, monumental size, and the infrequency of its bloom all factor in the uniqueness and related fame of this flower. The titan arum is thus cultivated by botanical gardens and private collections across the globe. Its bloom is considered a spectacle. In social media, to date, images, as well as live-feeds and time-lapse videos of at least 16 titan arums across the world are accessible 24/7. Her interest in this species was spurred while researching the importation of “exotic” flora and fauna into the Netherlands, where viewings and spectacles of these were organized for public appreciation. At present, one such corpse flower can be found at Hortus Botanicus, the botanical garden of the University of Leiden.

Rossella Biscotti
Live feed, 2019
silkscreen on cotton, rubber
Exhibition overview Rossella Biscotti, new work, 2019, Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam
Photographer: Kristien Daem
Rossella Biscotti
Live feed, 2019
silkscreen on cotton, rubber
Exhibition overview Rossella Biscotti, new work, 2019, Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam
Photographer: Kristien Daem